Yom Kippur Ticket sales have now closed.

Cost: Each ticket is a requested donation of $200 which must be paid ahead of time. This donation helps cover the costs of High Holiday programming, staffing, and supplies. Please note that Beth Shalom does not sell tickets to individual services or days for the High Holidays. Unfortunately, we cannot “divide up” a ticket for someone only looking for a single service. Requests for reduced rates are handled by the Front Office. Please call at least one week in advance.

Yom Kippur Only: Tickets for Yom Kippur only can be purchased starting October 2. These tickets are $100 each.

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Young adults (up to age 32): You may receive High Holiday tickets at no charge. (Donations are gratefully accepted via our Donation Page.) You must register in advance to receive tickets.

Beth Shalom Members: You will have tickets for each adult in your family mailed to you automatically; children up to age 22 do not need separate tickets. Please only use this form if you will be bringing guests and need to buy extra tickets, or if you would like to reserve young adult tickets for your children over 22 (up to age 32).

Members of Other Synagogues: Beth Shalom honors reciprocal tickets for other Conservative congregations; you don’t need to fill out this form. Out of town visitors who present a letter of good standing from their Conservative home synagogue will receive tickets at no charge. Please bring the letter to the office, or have your synagogue mail, email, or fax it to us by September  to receive your tickets on time. Reciprocity tickets will be held at Will Call, unless a local address is provided for mailing.

Non-Members (or members to be, we hope!): If you decide to join Beth Shalom within three months of the holidays, your ticket purchase price will be applied to your first year’s dues.

 

A full schedule of High Holiday programs and events can be found here.

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Our rabbis taught that one of the reasons for the destruction of the Temple was “sinat hinam,” senseless hatred amongst Jews.  Our rabbis also taught that the Messiah will be born on Tisha B’Av—suggesting that out of this destruction, there is also the potential of redemption, and reconciliation.
It is traditional on Tisha B’Av to refrain from eating, drinking, engaging in sexual relations, bathing and wearing leather shoes.  The study of religious texts is limited to those which enhance and reflect the day’s mood such as the books of Lamentations and Job and other texts referring to the destruction of Jerusalem.  Going to work, using money, driving and other  restrictions applicable to Shabbat and festivals are not applicable to Tisha B’Av.

Sunday, August 11
9:30am Shacharit
With special Tisha B’Av Torah reading and davening
(It is traditional to wear Tallit and Tefillin at Mincha instead of Shacharit)

7:15pm Mincha: Torah reading, Haftarah, Tallit and Tefillin
8:00pm Learning
9:05pm Ma’ariv
9:11pm Break Fast


Our rabbis taught that one of the reasons for the destruction of the Temple was “sinat hinam,” senseless hatred amongst Jews. Our rabbis also taught that the Messiah will be born on Tisha B’Av—suggesting that out of this destruction, there is also the potential of redemption, and reconciliation.
It is traditional on Tisha B’Av to refrain from eating, drinking, engaging in sexual relations, bathing and wearing leather shoes. The study of religious texts is limited to those which enhance and reflect the day’s mood such as the books of Lamentations and Job and other texts referring to the destruction of Jerusalem. Going to work, using money, driving and other restrictions applicable to Shabbat and festivals are not applicable to Tisha B’Av.

8:29pm Beginning of Fast (at sunset)
9:10pm Shabbat Ends
9:30pm Ma’ariv, Havdalah, Eichah, and Kinot (lamentations)


It is traditional to visit the cemetery the Sunday between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur; called Kever Avot, the literal translation is “graves of the fathers.”

That particular date we honor our loved ones who now sleep with their elders.  At the Beit Shalom cemetery section of Abbey View Cemetery, we will have a brief ceremony led by Sharon Greenberg.

Included will be time to visit a specific gravesite or especially a grave of someone whose relatives are many miles away.  Come and join your fellow congregants.


7:45-8:30pm  Mincha in our Beit Midrash (Torah reading, Haftarah, Tallit and  Tefillin)

8:30-9:30 learning

9:35-9:42 Maariv

9:42 break the fast, eating until 10:15

Our rabbis taught that one of the reasons for the destruction of the Temple was “sinat hinam,” senseless hatred amongst Jews.  Our rabbis also taught that the Messiah will be born on Tisha B’Av—suggesting that out of this destruction, there is also the potential of redemption, and reconciliation.

It is traditional on Tisha B’Av to refrain from eating, drinking, engaging in sexual relations, bathing and wearing leather shoes.  The study of religious texts is limited to those which enhance and reflect the day’s mood such as the books of Lamentations and Job and other texts referring to the destruction of Jerusalem.  Going to work, using money, driving and other  restrictions applicable to Shabbat and festivals are not applicable to Tisha B’Av.

 


8:58pm  Beginning of Fast (at sunset)

9:56pm  Shabbat Ends

10:00pm  Ma’ariv, Havdalah, Eichah, and Kinot (lamentations) in the Sanctuary.

Our rabbis taught that one of the reasons for the destruction of the Temple was “sinat hinam,” senseless hatred amongst Jews.  Our rabbis also taught that the Messiah will be born on Tisha B’Av—suggesting that out of this destruction, there is also the potential of redemption, and reconciliation.

It is traditional on Tisha B’Av to refrain from eating, drinking, engaging in sexual relations, bathing and wearing leather shoes.  The study of religious texts is limited to those which enhance and reflect the day’s mood such as the books of Lamentations and Job and other texts referring to the destruction of Jerusalem.  Going to work, using money, driving and other restrictions applicable to Shabbat and festivals are not applicable to Tisha B’Av.


Our regular Kabbalat Shabbat Service usually meets in the Beit Midrash – through the courtyard at the South end of the building.

Kabbalat Shabbat services will be at 6:00pm from March 2nd through May. Please check again in June for an update on when services will begin.


Our regular Kabbalat Shabbat Service usually meets in the Beit Midrash – through the courtyard at the South end of the building.

Kabbalat Shabbat services will be at 6:00pm from March 2nd through May. Please check again in June for an update on when services will begin.


Our regular Kabbalat Shabbat Service usually meets in the Beit Midrash – through the courtyard at the South end of the building.

Kabbalat Shabbat services will be at 6:00pm from March 2nd through May. Please check again in June for an update on when services will begin.


Our regular Kabbalat Shabbat Service usually meets in the Beit Midrash – through the courtyard at the South end of the building.

Kabbalat Shabbat services will be at 6:00pm from March 2nd through May. Please check again in June for an update on when services will begin.

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