Community & Adult Learning

Lifelong Learning

For more information on any of our classes, please click on individual links, check out our full calendar or contact our Community and Membership Engagement Director, Sarah Greenberg.

Service animals are always welcome at Beth Shalom. However, we politely request that congregants not bring their personal pets to events, services, or classes.

Empty Nesters, Endless Opportunities, and Food and Friends.

For more about Empty Nesters, please see Cybershul or the current Shavuon.
Current Endless Opportunities programs are listed here:May 2019 Flyer
Food and Friends information can be found on our Social Groups page.

2018-19 Year-long Classes

Living Judaism – a basic introduction to Judaism, including holidays, texts, and home traditions and a Hebrew class (below).  Living Judaism is our required course for conversion students.  Please click here for more information and a registration form.  A syllabus is available here.  Class will be held on Tuesday evenings from September 25, 2018- April 30, 2019 with two High Holiday preparation sessions on August 28 and September 4.

Learners’ Minyan – This program is designed for those who are looking to understand parts of the Shabbat morning service. It is appropriate for complete beginners and is part of our Living Judaism class. It is also appropriate for those looking to deepen their learning. Learner’s Minyan takes place on Saturdays once a month, 10:30-11:30 am, in the Beit Midrash. There is no cost to attend. Click here for more information and a complete schedule.

Check back soon for information about summer classes and next year’s year-long classes!

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Classes for Spring 2019: 

To contact the teacher for a class, click their name.

Tuesday Learning:

Creative Interpretation: How the Rabbis Radically Change the Meaning of the Torah in Traditional Ways with Rabbi Rose

How does the Talmud infer that the Torah’s clear assertion of “an eye for an eye” really means that the injured is owed monetary compensation?

Midrash, the process of rabbinic interpretation of the Torah, is often used to come to such thoroughly radical conclusions.  Why do the rabbis stretch the Torah’s meaning in this way? What are the boundaries of this creativity? How can we treat the Torah as divine and sacred while twisting its words?  Together we’ll explore these questions, both in the historical context of early rabbinic Judaism, and as they can serve as guides in our own wrestling with Torah. Tuesday nights, 7-8pm, April 30- May 21 (No class May 7), 3 sessions

Wednesday Learning:

Two English Translations of the Hebrew Bible: Robert Alter (21st Century) and King James Version (KJV) (17th Century), Part II with Rabbi Rob Toren

Join us for part two of this class with Rabbi Rob Toren! Participation in Part I is not required for Part II.

We will continue with a seven-session exploration of two translation masterpieces of the Hebrew Bible aka Tanakh.  With the original Hebrew as a starting point, we will note how these two artful translations wrestle with and attempt to resolve the daunting challenges of translation.  Knowledge of Biblical Hebrew is not required though certainly helpful in appreciating both translations’ artistry and skill.Rob will provide texts, though students are welcome to purchase their own editions.  A reminder that the KJV does contain the Christian Bible. Free of charge. Donations to the CBS adult education fund are appreciated. Wednesday nights, 7:30-8:45pm, May 15- June 26 (7 sessions)

 

Shabbat Afternoon Learning: Saturdays at 1:15 PM following Kiddush Lunch. No charge

Saturday, June 15: In Search of the Holy Life: Rediscovering the Kabbalistic Roots of Mussar with Beth Shalom’s first rabbi and a scholar of Mussar, Rabbi Ira Stone

Scholar in Residence

Click here for information about our annual Scholar in Residence program.

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Technology Tip – Need to type in Hebrew?  Installing a Hebrew keyboard on a smartphone.

Library Donations: The CBS Library is accepting donations!

If you want to donate books on Jewish topics, here are our guidelines.

  1. We do not take siddurim or machzorim unless they are the ones we are currently using in shul.
  2. We appreciate donations of modern Jewish fiction, biographies and lighter history, published since 2010 for the honor lending cart and newer books for the library on Jewish living, thought, and Bible for the library.   Older Jewish fiction and general books on Judaism not more than 25 years old usually will go on the free book cart.

Thank you!

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